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Crochet Pattern Repeats and Multiples

Within a row and within a pattern you may repeat stitches several times. These are written in repeats to make the pattern easier to read. If you find it difficult to follow along a pattern written this way, you can always take another piece of paper and write out every repeat yourself.

Repeats

One common method is to have an asterisk * somewhere in the row, and then instructions to repeat from the *. For example, you may have a row that is *sc, dc; repeat from * to end of row. In this case, you will single crochet once, double crochet once, single crochet once, double crochet once, and so on until you reach the end of the row. A similar version is *sc, dc; repeat from * to 3 stitches from end. In this case you will single crochet once, double crochet once, single crochet once, double crochet once until there are 3 stitches left unworked. The pattern would then tell you what to do with the 3 stitches at the end.

You may also have parentheses ( ) and/or brackets [ ] in a row. If both are used, parentheses are within brackets. For example, (sc in next 2 sts, dc in next 3 stitches) twice, then sc across would have you single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the following three stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the following three stitches, before you single crochet the rest of the stitches in the row. [Sc in next 2 sts, (dc in next 3 stitches, sc in next 2 stitches) twice] three times would have you single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the next three stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the next three stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the next three stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the next three stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the next three stitches, single crochet in each of the next two stitches, double crochet in each of the next three stitches, and single crochet in each of the next two stitches. Can you see why these are abbreviated?

Stitch Patterns

On many crochet projects there is one pattern that is repeated multiple times.

Pattern repeats are usually done over a specific number of stitches and a specific number of rows. The stitch patterns are may be given at the start of a pattern, or you may see it because you repeat the same row or rows of the pattern multiple times.

For example, in Dynamite Eyeglass Case, you are just asked to repeat Round 2 for certain rounds and to repeat Round 5 for other rounds.

Complex patterns, including some cable patterns, will have you switch between stitch patterns within the same row.

Pattern Multiples

Many pattern repeats tell you how many stitches they require to work. These repeats are call multiples. Multiples are useful if you like the pattern stitch from one pattern and want to use it on another project, or if you want to adapt a pattern to change its size. For example, you may like the pattern stitch on a sweater, and want to use it to make a scarf, or you may want to take a ripple throw and make it into a bedspread for a king-size bed. Knowing the pattern multiple allows you to figure out how many chains you need to make another project with that stitch pattern.

Some stitch patterns will just say that they are worked over an even number of stitches or over an odd number of stitches. To use one of these stitch patterns on another project, you would just need an even number of stitches or an odd number of stitches, following what the pattern says.

Other stitch patterns will give you a specific number of stitches that it takes to work the stitch pattern. In this case, you will need to chain the number of stitches needed for the stitch pattern times a whole number, and then add the amount you need for your turning chain. If the stitch pattern is worked over 9 stitches, for example, you can chain 18 (from 9 x 2), 27 (from 9 x 3), 81 (from 9 x 9) and so on, and then add the number for your turning chain. Sometimes the multiple for a pattern is given as one number plus another number. For example, it may need a multiple of 10 + 2. This means that it will require 10 stitches (or 20 stitches, or 30 stitches, etc.) plus an additional 2 stitches. You would then add the amount for your turning chain to this number.

Below: LW5356 Let's Relax Throw Free Crochet Pattern

Crochet Pattern Repeats and Multiples